Our Perspective

      • The nightmare of violence against women, seen up close | Neus Bernabeu

        28 May 2014

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        HOY, MÁS QUE NUNCA, EL TEMA ESTÁ PRESENTE EN LA AGENDA PÚBLICA Y PROVOCA EL RECHAZO SOCIAL Y MOVILIZACIONES. FOTO: PNUD PERÚ

        Nothing is more powereful to raise awareness abour violence against women than experiencing this nightmare first-hand. We always think such things only happen to others, but current data shows that violence against women is horridly common, albeit in different forms and degrees of cruelty. According to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), one in every four women in the region experiences some form of violence from her partner. This is also the leading cause of death worldwide for women aged 15 to 49 -- killing more women than cancer, malaria, traffic and war-related incidents. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence against Women, known as “Convention of Belem do Pará.” How much have we advanced in the past two decades? Less than one third of countries in the region (28 percent) have a specific national plan to respond to this issue, and most (78 percent) approach it tangentially in other plans or national security policies. This is corroborated by our UNDP analysis  carried out in 32 countries in the region, which led to the study “States' Commitment: plans and policies to eradicate violence against women in LatinRead More

      • Can Small Island Developing States wait for global development goals to be set? | Gonzalo Pizarro

        14 May 2014

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        THE UNDP DOMINICAN REPUBLIC OFFICE WORKS TOWARDS REDUCING RISK AND VULNERABILITY AND INCREASING CAPACITY TO REDUCE THE ADVERSE EFFECTS OF DISASTERS AND ENSURE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. PHOTO: R. D. EMILIANO LARIZZA FOR UNDP.

        Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have been, and still are, facing major challenges in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs):  low growth, high unemployment, aging population, brain drain, high debt levels, small carrying capacities and extreme exposure to the effects of climate change. One example is Saint Maarten, a small island in the Dutch Antilles, which every week welcomes more tourists arriving on cruise ships than it has inhabitants. As Saint Maarten is highly dependent on tourism, maintaining and protecting the natural environment is essential to its socio-economic wellbeing. The tourist industry accounts for 80 percent of the island’s GDP. Reef tourism and fishing are important attractions. But the development world’s attention is now being set on the post-2015 agenda and the proposal for a new set of global goals, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which will emerge with their accompanying targets this September at the UN General Assembly. This new agenda is anchored on the understanding that you can’t have development without simultaneously caring for its social, economic and environmental dimensions.   For Saint Maarten, sustainable development is not just a matter of negotiations at UN Headquarters, it is a matter of immediate action.  The country, aware of this challenge,Read More

      • Friendly clinics for sexual diversity | Manuel Irizar

        06 May 2014

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        LBGT PEOPLE ASPIRE TO RECEIVE THE SAME HEALTH, EDUCATION, OR EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AS ALL OF US. PHOTO: UNDP IN COLOMBIA

        In recent years, Argentinian society has made significant progress as relates to the full exercise of citizens’ rights. However, sexually diverse groups such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LBGT) people still face discriminatory situations affecting dramatically their quality of life. Access to free public health services for LGBTs has always been problematic in Argentina. At UNDP, we consider that the system’s shortcomings must be countered by concrete initiatives - such as theFriendly Clinics for Sexual Diversity. Financed by our Regional Office, the project involves setting up dedicated areas for LGBTs as part of the public health service. These areas are supervised through joint action by social organizations, local HIV programs and Public Hospital Services. A joint task force involving civil society organizations and a health team working at the Public Hospital has been established to raise awareness of the Friendly Clinics, and to encourage and accompany regular visits by members of the diversity groups accessing health care. The health team provides services such as medical care, counseling   and diagnosis of HIV and other STDs (Sexually Transmitted Diseases), psychosocial support and schedules specific treatments required by the patients. To get this proposal off the ground,we surveyed 11 provinces across the country toRead More